04 July

Peachy Keen in New Jersey

The juicy sun-kissed peach captures the flavor of summer and is one of the most popular fruits of the season.

A native of China, the peach was first introduced to the New World by Spanish explorers in 1571.

By the 1600’s peaches had become an important crop in New Jersey. Learn the history and folklore of this New Jersey summertime favorite.

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04 July

History of English Tea

History of English Tea Discover the fascinating history of this much–loved beverage! Tea was first introduced to England in the 17th century. At first it was used for medicinal purposes and sold in London’s early coffee houses. Only when Catherine of Braganza (an avid tea drinker) of Portugal married England’s Charles II did tea become a social beverage. In 1840, Anna the 7th Duchess of Bedford is credited with inventing the custom of Afternoon Tea, a tradition that was embraced by Queen Victoria. Understand the difference between High Tea and Afternoon Tea and learn proper tea etiquette and customs.

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04 July

Victorian Parlor Games

The Victorians loved to entertain, and the best way to entertain was to play games. In the 19th century, before electronics changed our habits, people gathered in homes for entertainment and played parlor or board games for recreation. The host or hostess might plan seven or eight games to be played throughout the evening with perhaps a light refreshment between games. Learn some old-fashioned games such as, Lookabout, Change Seats! and Pass the Slipper. Be prepared to play and have fun!

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04 July

The Asian Tea Experience – China and Japan

Tea in China and Japan is enjoyed in many forms from a simple bowl of tea to the beautiful and intricate tea ceremony. Learn about everyday tea drinking, the Chinese tea ceremony – gong fu cha, and the Japanese tea ceremony – cha-no-yu.  There will be a tea-making demonstration, and a selection of Asian tea implements will be on display.

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04 July

The Harvest Season

Autumn was a season of hard work for early Americans. Neighbors joined together to help each other during harvest time. Numerous hands were needed to butcher, preserve, and prepare many foods. School was canceled for days so children could help their parents with the harvest chores. The fruits of spring and summer labor were enjoyed during this season, which was also a time of feasting and recreation. Learn how our forefathers prepared for the long winter ahead while celebrating the harvest season.

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04 July

Asian Tea – China and Japan

Tea in China and Japan is enjoyed in many forms from a simple bowl of tea to the beautiful and intricate tea ceremony. Learn about everyday tea drinking, the Chinese tea ceremony – gong fu cha, and the Japanese tea ceremony – cha-no-yu.  There will be a tea-making demonstration, and a selection of Asian tea implements will be on display.

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04 July

Apron Workshops

The Expressive Apron Workshops Each person will receive a plain, white half apron in which to “express’ themselves. The apron can be your journal or canvas. You can write on the apron, paint, hand-sew or glue on decorations, silk flowers and attach photos etc.

Posted by Judith Krall-Russo under Tea-Food History | Comment » (0 comments) |

04 July

Victorian Parlor Games

The Victorians loved to entertain, and the best way to entertain was to play games. In the 19th century, before electronics changed our habits, people gathered in homes for entertainment and played parlor or board games for recreation. The host or hostess might plan seven or eight games to be played throughout the evening with perhaps a light refreshment between games. Learn some old-fashioned games such as, Lookabout, Change Seats! and Pass the Slipper. Be prepared to play and have fun!

Posted by Judith Krall-Russo under Tea-Food History | Comment » (0 comments) |